What is THAT?!?

Did I get you to look?  No?  Oh….

Here is the long-promised bit on knitting. 🙂  The suspense is over everybody, you can chill now.

Now, being honest, that’s not exactly how most people respond to crafters doing their thing in public, but it’s come pretty close before.  When commencing this post, I started to go on a rantle(a rambling rant, but it was a polite rant), but I decided to delete it, and start over.  All you need to know is the #1 most asked question when knitting, knotting, or needling, in public is “Is that knitting or crocheting?”.  The second most asked question is “What are you making?”.  So, I’ve been thinking about this for a while, and here are some helpful tips to tell what exactly that person is doing to pass time in the waiting room(or wherever you come across a crafter).  Normally it’s nice to ask instead of awkward silence, which is good, but here’s some information to help you have a little more knowledge about it.  And just a hint, if it looks like a sock….It’s probably a sock.  I promise there aren’t very many people who will bite you if asked what they are making. 😉 This is looking more and more like my previous rantle, so we’d better get started-

Without further ado, the differences between knitting and crocheting…..

1.  The tools.

Knitting is a craft that requires big needles(as opposed to sewing needles), crocheting requires a hook.  Another difference is how many of the tools they are using- crocheters always have one hook(as far as I know).  Knitters can have anywhere from 2 needles, up to 5.  You never know…..Unless they are using a circular needle- that’s a whole different subject….

If for some reason you can’t tell because someone is knitting with crochet hooks, or crocheting with a knitting needle, keep reading….

2. How it builds on itself.

That really isn’t the best description, but I can’t think of how to say “what you do to make your project bigger, and how the tools help”….That right there doesn’t even make sense.  Bear with me, please.  The difference I am trying to describe is how with knitting you actually have a whole bunch of “live” stitches, where if you take out the knitting needle that they are sitting on, your project will unravel.  Crocheting on the other hand(haha, can you knit with one hand and crochet with the other?  I would love to see you try….), is done where you only have one live stitch on your hook at a time.  So, it’s really easy to finish a crocheting project- cut the yarn, tie a knot through the loop, you’re done.  Knitting has a fancy technique called “casting off”, which isn’t a big deal at all once you get the hang of it, but the trick is getting the tension to match the cast on.  That’s a doosie.  Summary- crocheting looks like it’s hanging on by a thread(literally) to the crochet hook, and knitting has all the stitches on the needle and comes unraveled so easily it will appall you.  At least it has me.  It’s a sad day, but I’ve coped and learned how to fix it. 🙂

3. The appearance.

This one is tricky- knitting and crocheting look totally different.  There are some stitches done in one craft that sort of resemble the other, but for the most part there’s almost no similarity.  Other than the fact that they are both comprised of yarn.  Because this takes specific knowledge of at least one or the other, I’ll stop right there.  Just stick with the other two ways to tell, but know that there is a difference between the appearance of knitting and crocheting.  Try asking someone that, maybe instead of which they are doing.  It could lead to a much more interesting conversation!

So, now you know.  You can shock a yarn-loving person with your amazing knowledge of their work.  Or you can just ask them the regular questions, because that’s what they are accustomed to answering.  Either way, it’s fine.  But hopefully, you learned something today about knitting and crocheting!  I apologize if you were looking for a detailed history of both crafts- I recommend Wikipedia for that. I honestly don’t know a whole bunch about their history, but I do know that they’ve been around for a LONG time.

As always, thank you for reading!  I appreciate your time. And….if you have any more knowledge you can share on how to tell knitting apart from crocheting , there’s an empty little comment box below just waiting for you! 🙂  Or you can just tell me what your favorite craft is!  Or you can take a wild guess which my favorite is…. I’d love to hear it all.  Please enjoy the rest of your week, and  have a Happy Thursday!

Making Cookies!

I made cookies.  From scratch.  Before you start picturing just plain chocolate chip cookies, remember to include some oatmeal bits in your imagination!  That is the type of cookies I make- chocolate chip *oatmeal* cookies.  It makes them slightly healthier, right?  Adds a little protein, and other healthy thingys.  It doesn’t affect the flavor a whole bunch, but I’ve never done a side-by-side comparison either.  Feel free to try it yourself and let me know how they compare!  ***Make sure both are homemade- comparing store-bought and homemade would be like comparing….um….. something that isn’t very comparable.  FYI, I am not good at making up examples.

Pros of homemade

Warmmmmm Cooooookies……….  They are SO good.  There are probably some really fancy hoity-toity desserts out there (that all require refrigeration!) that blow chocolate chip cookies out of the water, but a fresh-baked cookie is hard to beat in my book.  The warm, slightly crunchy-gooey cookie part, with the hot, melted chocolate chips.  Melt in your mouth type.  Good luck getting that from ‘Chips Ahoy!’.

Homemade cookies are probably healthier than your average store-bought cookie.  AND, you know exactly what you put in them!  I don’t know about you, but sometimes I speculate on exactly who or what has touched what I am putting in my mouth….

You can stick them in adorable cookie jars!  Not that we have one, I just thought I’d throw that out there.  Well, you can do that with store-bought cookies too….maybe this will just be a neutral point. 😉

Cons of homemade

Fingers are *not* in the recipe, and yet they always find their way into my cookie dough.  Mind you, they are not MY fingers…The cookie dough is minding it’s own business in the bowl where I left it, when some passerby decides that warm cookies just can’t come fast enough- so they swipe some dough while I am turned around.

Another con of homemade is that they are hard to stop eating, but the same can be said of store-bought. 😉  Those are the only cons I can think of.  Oh!  Nope, there is another.  It is far more time-consuming to make your own cookies, rather than pick up a package at the grocery store.  True dat.

Homemade cookies also don’t come with a container- you have to get your own, and try to fit all the cookies in it properly.  Sigh…. And if they don’t all fit, you just have to eat the extras!

Pros of store-bought

Store-bought cookies still taste good.  I’m not shooting down the poor little cookies that were mass-produced.  They get plenty of love too. 🙂  I have only one met one type of cookie that I do not enjoy getting acquainted with- oatmeal raisin.  Since I make chocolate chip oatmeal, it’s perfectly logical of you to assume that it is the raisin that I discriminate against. You would be right.  I do NOT  like raisins.  Anywhere or anytime.  I am an equal-opportunity raisin-disliker.  It’s a texture thing.

Another pro is that purchasing cookies, instead of making your own, is potentially cheaper.  I’ve never done a comparison.  So I don’t know.  But it seems like making your own of almost anything costs more.  Thanks for encouraging do-it-yourself-ness!

Cons of store-bought

If you give cookies to someone, it’s a much more personal gift if you make them yourself.  Like I said earlier, a cookie is a cookie- most all of them are yummy.  But still, it means a little bit more when you can say, “Here, I made these for you!”, rather than “Here, I went to the grocery store and picked these up for you”.  I’m having a hard time exactly phrasing the difference, but it’s there…. whatever it is.  At least that’s how I’m hoping my brother feels about it when a certain package filled with enough sugary stuff to rot some teeth, gets to Iowa for his birthday…..(Shhh, it’s a surprise!)  He is certainly not a picky eater, but it makes me happy to think that he would pick my cookies over a store-bought….especially when they are warm out of the oven.  This blog post (#2 so far) is dedicated to him, for his birthday.  Just in case cookies aren’t enough. 🙂

Store-bought cookies are all fairly uniform.  There are almost always none with more chocolate chips than the others…. This can be a pro sometimes, but it makes them less unique.  And you can’t make a ‘custom’ choice when taking a cookie out of the container.

Those are my pros and cons for cookies of both kinds.  Maybe you enjoyed reading it, or maybe you’re just really hating me right now because you want a cookie and you don’t care what type it is.  😛

I won’t put a picture on here, just in case you haven’t eaten yet!

Have a great day, and thanks for reading!!!